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NASA is very interested in keeping the Earth science community informed about activities, progress, and opportunities regarding the Earth Decadal Survey. For information about the Decadal Survey and for people to provide written input, feedback, and questions NASA has created a special webpage. Click here for the Earth Decadal Survey. Snow is featured in multiple places in the 2017 Earth Science Decadal Survey—click here for an overview.

Snow as a Vital Link in the Hydrologic Cycle

Snow is life. It is the water we drink and is necessary to grow food that we require. Atmospheric clouds redistribute water around our Earth and when conditions are right, falling snow reaches the surface. Mountains collect and store snow in winter, and spring snowmelt feeds streams and reservoirs that supply water to people and crops, and it also generates electricity. The white blanket of snow cover drives climate processes and cools the planet.

But changes in snow quantity and snowmelt timing are underway and have serious consequences. However, the quantity of snow stored across the prairies and tundra, in the mountains, on sea ice, and in the forests remains difficult to measure, hindering efforts to understand how, why and where this precious resource is changing. Airborne and satellite remote sensing provides a means of measuring these changes in a consistent manner over large areas on a regular basis, but developing the optimal instruments to measure snow requires an investment of dollars and a long-term (several decades) effort. NASA seeks to measure global snow cover using multiple approaches including aircraft and field campaigns as well as through modeling and data assimilation, all derived from competitively-selected research activities.  These important efforts will culminate in an improved understanding that will enable development and launch of a satellite dedicated to snow research. We need to make these investments now to enable water resource managers, who base their decisions on historical records, to optimize hydrological forecasts during changing hydrologic conditions.

To begin, we need to conduct a series of community-wide field experiments that spans a range of snow types and during which we deploy multiple remote sensing technologies. The results of this work will enable informed choices about optimal instrument synergy to move forward for development of a satellite dedicated to snow research.

Credit: Got Snow

FAQ's: 

What is snow?

Snow is life. It is the water we drink and is needed to grow food that we eat. Mountains collect and store snow in winter, and spring snowmelt feeds streams and reservoirs that supply water to people and crops, and it also generates electricity. The white blanket of snow cover drives climate processes and cools the planet.

Why snow?

Snow is a source of water for billions of people – and modulates the Earth’s energy balance and influences weather systems. The annual flooding caused by snowmelt is responsible for significant loss of life with billions of dollars of economic impact worldwide.

What is NASA doing about snow?

NASA uses the vantage point of space to study all aspects of the Earth as a system, including snow.

Recent News

Increase in rain-on-snow flood risk in many mountain regions of the western US, Canada

Tuesday, August 7, 2018

NASA building new tools to manage water as climate dangers grow

Monday, May 28, 2018

Every inch of snow that fell in the U.S. in 2017-2018 winter

Monday, March 26, 2018

Nor'easter snowstorm hits US Northeast

Wednesday, March 7, 2018

Click the picture below to see our Flickr album!

SnowEx Winter Campaign 2017